My Love Affair with Wei’Qi

I like to think that, shortly after learning of the game of Go, I experienced a meteoric rise in skill. The truth is that I progressed at about an average pace. I played a lot of games. So many games did I play, in fact, that my dreams were dreams of Go. I played professionals. I played Amateurs. I played as many people as I could find.

And yet… people would ask me, “What do you do for fun”? I would reply that I played Go, and inevitably, they would say, “What?”

Go, or Wei’Qi, is a wonderful game. In my view, better than chess. But it’s time has passed, and in its place has risen the realm of first-person shooters, and Super Mario, Galaxy. I do not mean to imply that such things are bad or not worth time. Nothing of the sort. But, for those of us who enjoy sitting down at the local pub and feeling a game piece in your hand, nothing beats the game of Go.

It is a dying art, to sit and ponder a position as abstract as the stones on a Goban. Sometimes, it is painful. You want to win so badly that you lose all focus, and then you start making mistakes. And that lies the beauty of the game. You see, Go, or Wei’Qi, is fun precisely because it is about control. It is about attack, and power, and influence, and getting inside another person’s head. Unfortunately, in the game, as in real life, such things require patience, and time. In America, the people with patience have no time, and the people with time have no patience.

Will Wei’Qi ever be popular in the West? It certainly is flagging in popularity in the East. Perhaps that is the ultimate thought. Go is an old man’s game. Even so, for all that the game belongs to the province of old men, it sure gives the feeling of infinite power.

If you’re an old man, and you want to experience infinite power, playing go might not be a bad idea. Clickeh yeh hereh, Sireth: Wei’Qi.

 

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